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I have recently posted about the rosy future for translators, despite the recent rise of no-longer-quite-as-terrible-gibberish-producing machine translation, and at the SDL Roadshow I attended this week in Munich, the statistics also confirmed that translation (and related fields) is a strongly growing industry and there will be plenty of work to go around in the future. I am by far not the only one writing and thinking about this topic, …

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In Germany, we enjoy a long weekend on Easter, because both Good Friday and Easter Monday are holidays here – which means no work! And I for one have been in need of some off time, let me tell you… But anyway, even if it is all play this weekend, here’s a little language lesson for you: Do you know where the word “Easter” comes from? In case you don’t, …

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Continuing with last week’s topic, here’s another interesting article on the connection between language and music, more specifically, on how singing makes learning a foreign language easier: Singing in a Foreign Language Helps You Learn Better Than Just Speaking It There’s a new study by the University of Edinburgh Reid School of Music that shows singing in a foreign language is a better way to learn it than simply …

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Since I started teaching interpretation, I have had to think a lot about what it means to be an interpreter, what knowledge, skills and also talent are required, and how to teach this to or, in the case of the talent, how to find out if they have it and then coax it out of the students and help them develop it. I have found some books on techniques …

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Have you ever wanted to scream because of fantastical spelling and toe-curling grammar in posts, comments, e-mails etc.? Well, here’s a funny and really well-made little video about a dream killed: Missmatch (“I Dreamed a Dream” Parody) – watch more funny videos

 

The great BDÜ video comparing the translations of a real flesh-and-blood translator with the results by Google Translate I wrote about here is now also available in English:

 

Reading Nataly Kelly’s article “The Words We Use to Describe Ourselves” published in the October issue of the ATA Chronicle, I came across the neologism “interpretator“, a hybrid of the words translator and interpreter. I think it should become the new word for those of us who both translate and interpret.  I do, so from now on I will refer to myself as interpretator… Who’s with me? 😉 …

 

Wie gut ist Google Translate wirklich? Vor Kurzem hat der BDÜ es einmal ausprobiert: Ein “echter” Übersetzer aus Fleisch und Blut im Vergleich mit der v.a. unter Laien so hoch gelobten maschinellen Übersetzung. Das Ergebnis? Sehen Sie selbst…

 

How to write a blog post about a conference? That’s the question I’m asking myself right now. Not an easy task, methinks, since although short, it was packed: Two and a half days filled with interesting lectures, lively panel discussions and instructive workshops, with meeting colleagues and friends, some again, others for the first time (yes, that would be you, my dear Twitteros), with drinking coffee and water (and …

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The topic of the connection between music and language, which I have already talked about here, keeps coming up for some reason…  Today, I came across this very interesting article in my Twitter time line: Music Underlies Language Acquisition, Theorists Propose. The article basically says that contrary to common belief, music is “not dependent on or derived from language”, but rather that “spoken language is a special type of …

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I apologize beforehand, but this is going to be a bit of a rant… Comments and differing views are of course welcome! 😉 Source: Wikipedia I was watching the movie “The 13th Warrior” the other day. Not wanting to evaluate the movie or the story, there are some things I just have to say, because it’s just so… impossible not to say anything about them as a language professional. …

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I read this article about natural translators and musicians a while ago, and it got me thinking. Being a musician myself and having started my musical education at the tender age of three, I wonder if my musical talent has anything to do with my linguistic ability – or if it maybe even helped it emerge. To be sure, I’ve met plenty of musicians, including professional ones, who have …

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Since I’m on a mini-vacation again this week, here’s an excerpt from an excellent post from the myGengo blog on how to judge the quality of a translation: Before submitting Prior to submitting your text to be translated, make sure you give the translator proper context. In addition to giving a brief summary detailing what the intentions for the translation are, also be sure to guide the translator on …

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Eine Kollegin verwies neulich auf diesen Rundfunkbeitrag des WDR, der wirklich absolut hörenswert ist: Sie übersetzte Asterix und Obelix. Gudrun Penndorf erzählt rund 23 Minuten unter Anderem darüber wie sie überhaupt dazu kam, die ersten 29 Bände des gallischen Unbeugsamen zu übersetzen und welche Tücken in der Comic-Übersetzung an sich stecken. Ganz nebenbei bekommt man dann auch noch einen Eindruck davon, wie das früher so ging – ohne Handy, …

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Beim Übersetzen muss man bis ans Unübersetzliche herangehen; alsdann wird man aber erst die fremde Nation und die fremde Sprache gewahr. When translating one must proceed up to the intranslatable; only then one becomes aware of the foreign nation and the foreign tongue. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

Read to the end . . a new twist 1) The bandage was wound around the wound. 2) The farm was used to produce produce. 3) The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse. 4) We must polish the Polish furniture. 5) He could lead if he would get the lead out. 6) The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert. 7) Since …

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  (c) bookofjoe

 

Mark Twain’s remarks about the irregularities and irrationality of spelling in the English language.  ADDRESS AT THE DINNER GIVEN TO MR. CARNEGIE AT THE DEDICATION OF THE NEW YORK ENGINEERS’ CLUB, DECEMBER 9, 1907 Mr. Clemens was introduced by the president of the club, who, quoting from the Mark Twain autobiography, recalled the day when the distinguished writer came to New York with $3 in small change in his pockets …

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A very handy little guide to remembering how to spell things correctly, especially those homophones. (by The Oatmeal) Warning: Not for the tender-hearted….

 

The last 3 weeks have been grueling – I was inundated with work (which is a good thing) and had 3 business trips (among them the workshop I held on RSS Feeds) and 4 private events, in part also requiring travel, all vying for my attention, all needing time and preparation. I finally turned in the last project this morning after another late night, and already there are new jobs …

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Apostrophe sind schon eine tolle Sache – wenn man sie richtig zu setzen weiß! Wenn nicht, kommen manchmal recht seltsame, lustige und mitunter auch ganz falsche Ergebnisse dabei heraus. Aber es gibt eine gute Nachricht: Ines Balcik hat sich zu dem Thema Gedanken gemacht und ein wunderbar verständliches und einfach zu verwendendes Dokument erstellt, mit dem garantiert kein Apostroph mehr an der falschen Stelle landet, herunterzuladen hier. The thing about …

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Caution! This joke contains some violence and strong language. A giant panda goes into one of those expensive and pretentious restaurants serving French/Asian fusion cuisine and takes a table for one. The surprised waiter for that table explains unctuously that his name is Marcel, he will be your server tonight, and we ‘ave a number of specials (he is French), etc., etc. The panda listens impassively to the list of …

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Just a little thought on language – the English one, in this case. Enjoy!