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practice

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I came across an excellent article on prices and costs over at Ferris Translations this week, and I wanted to share it with you: Dumping costs? What?!? Posted on February 10, 2014 by Michael Ferris Within the language industry, like any industry, there are also translators and language service providers that offer dumping prices. What are dumping prices? These are prices that are considered “unfair” to the competition because …

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Since I started teaching interpretation, I have had to think a lot about what it means to be an interpreter, what knowledge, skills and also talent are required, and how to teach this to or, in the case of the talent, how to find out if they have it and then coax it out of the students and help them develop it. I have found some books on techniques …

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I have written a few times about pricing and discounts lately, and how the tendency is to go down with prices especially when times are tough, even if only temporarily. Now this article by Paul Sulzberger published on The translation business has been making the rounds in the translator community, proposing a completely different approach to falling prices – namely to raise them?! It is kind of long, but …

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Als freiberuflicher Übersetzer passiert es einem immer wieder: die Anfrage nach einer kostenlosen Übersetzung. Wie man am besten darauf reagiert? Hier ist eine tolle und wirklich hilfreiche Graphik: Sollte ich kostenlos arbeiten? As a freelance translator it happens again and again: the request for a free translation. How to best react to it? Here’s a really helpful chart: Should I work for free?

 

Ich bin nun schon eine Weile als Dolmetscherin unterwegs, und bis jetzt wurde ich entweder über Agenturen oder Kollegen, die alles organisiert haben, angeheuert (Privatkunden auf dem Standesamt zähle ich jetzt mal nicht dazu). Gestern nun kam meine erste Dolmetschanfrage von einem Direktkunden (dem ich übrigens von Kontakten aus meinem beruflichen Netzwerk empfohlen wurde), und der wollte, dass ich in meinem Angebot auch gleich die Technik mit einbeziehe. Nun …

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Agencies – for many translators and interpreters, it almost seems to be a dirty word, probably because of the bad experiences they had with them. I know there are many different types of agencies out there, and so far I’ve had the great fortune to work with mostly those that are worth the name, not what I call “re-bagers” (“Umtüter” in German), meaning someone who simply passes a job …

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The great BDÜ video comparing the translations of a real flesh-and-blood translator with the results by Google Translate I wrote about here is now also available in English:

 

Reading Nataly Kelly’s article “The Words We Use to Describe Ourselves” published in the October issue of the ATA Chronicle, I came across the neologism “interpretator“, a hybrid of the words translator and interpreter. I think it should become the new word for those of us who both translate and interpret.  I do, so from now on I will refer to myself as interpretator… Who’s with me? 😉 …

 

I read this article about natural translators and musicians a while ago, and it got me thinking. Being a musician myself and having started my musical education at the tender age of three, I wonder if my musical talent has anything to do with my linguistic ability – or if it maybe even helped it emerge. To be sure, I’ve met plenty of musicians, including professional ones, who have …

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Although I had been thinking about it off and on for quite a while now, I only recently decided to go ahead and purchase me  – a Dragon. One reason why  it took me so long (I first heard about him at the BDÜ Conference in Berlin 2009) was that I thought I had to purchase a license for every language I work with, i.e. one for German, one …

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Since I’m on a mini-vacation again this week, here’s an excerpt from an excellent post from the myGengo blog on how to judge the quality of a translation: Before submitting Prior to submitting your text to be translated, make sure you give the translator proper context. In addition to giving a brief summary detailing what the intentions for the translation are, also be sure to guide the translator on …

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… your shoulders won’t straighten anymore because you’ve been in a hunched-over position for so long … your jaw starts hurting because you yawn so much … your eyes start hurting because it’s gotten dark and you haven’t noticed, thus not turning on a light … you turn on the coffeemaker without placing a cup underneath/filling it with coffee/filling it with water … you start using the keyboard shortcuts …

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My office is closed for a few days over Easter, so I’m taking the easy way out this week by sharing a great article by Debbie Swanson on the Freelance Switch blog. Having two dogs myself, I can really recommend it! Most freelancers are eager for tips and information, turning to forums, classes, and networking for ways to learn and improve. But did you ever consider looking to your …

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Als Freiberufler ist man ohne Mobiltelefon eigentlich aufgeschmissen. Ich wäre es auf jeden Fall, was aber v.a. damit zu tun hat, dass mein “Handlich” mehr ist als nur ein Telefon, nämlich auch Terminkalender, Adressbuch und Notizblock. Außerdem erinnert es mich an wichtige Dinge, und – sehr wichtig – ich kann damit E-Mails empfangen und versenden. Nichtsdestotrotz ist es natürlich auch ein Telefon, und ich verwende es auch als solches, …

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To do two things at once is to do neither. (Publius Syrus) We all know the saying that women can multi-task and men cannot. And we all know that this is not necessarily true and probably also know more than one example for the complete opposite. Personally, I am a bit torn about this. On the one hand, I have been multi-tasking since long before I ever heard of it …

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